Bay Area real estate | One square foot is worth a month’s rent

Oh, the pain, the pain — and the cost, the cost — of renting a Bay Area apartment.

A luxury condo sold last month in San Francisco’s Russian Hill neighborhood for $4.35 million. It’s a two-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath, 1,960-square-foot unit lined with walls of windows, mimicking the style of a mid-century Eichler home. Set on the 31st floor at 999 Green Street, with expansive views of the city, the apartment’s cost per square foot is $2,219.

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“That means that just one foot of the place is more than you pay in rent for your tiny San Francisco apartment,” wrote Alexa Collins of the Home light real estate website. “You could probably fit a toaster in that space. Or a corner of your bed.”

The cost per square foot is close to a match for what many people pay for two-bedroom apartments in San Jose, Oakland and other Bay Area cities. According to a June report from ApartmentList.com, which tracks the national apartment market, the median monthly rent for a two-bedroom unit in San Jose was $2,570 last month. In Oakland, it was $2,500.

However, San Francisco is a slightly different story. One might say that the value of two square feet at 999 Green — $4,438 — is more in line with what San Francisco tenants pay for their two-bedroom apartments. According to ApartmentList.com, the median monthly rent for a two-bedroom flat in San Francisco was $4,550 last month.

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And in case you were wondering about those walls of windows: 999 Green Street is known as The Summit. It is a modern Eichler-style apartment house, described by Collins as “a rectangular skyscraper with a beige central concrete column that divides the building in half. You’ll find resemblance between the facade of Eichler houses and this building in the two walls of windows that make up the four corners of each unit. San Francisco’s elite (who) own property in the mid-century modern … units have sprawling views of the city.”

Developer Joseph L. Eichler built distinctive, mid-century tract homes that create the sense of bringing the outdoors into their flowing, light-filled interiors, lined with windows. In 1949-1974, Eichler — while based in Palo Alto and, later, San Francisco — built 10,500 houses across the region, even entire Eichler neighborhoods, from Walnut Creek to San Jose’s Willow Glen.

For More Information: Richard Scheinin

Sacramento Is California’s Newest Real-Estate Hot Spot

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Price cuts have been replaced by bidding wars. A once-sleepy downtown is flush with urban-renewal projects. A luxury condo tower with penthouses priced over $4 million is under construction. Sacramento, Calif., long seen as a fairly bland government town, is in the midst of a real estate boom.

When Suzanne Greer listed her six-bedroom home just outside of Sacramento last month, so many potential buyers showed up to the three-hour open house that her real-estate agent had to extend it by two hours. Offers started coming in that evening. Eight buyers entered a bidding war.

“We’ve been here 17 or 18 years and have never seen it like this,” says Ms. Greer, who, with her husband, owns a commercial air conditioning business. She sold the home for $40,000 over the $799,000 asking price—plus two months of free rent so she doesn’t have to move out right away while she builds a new home nearby.

Houses are moving fast. Homes in Sacramento have been selling in an average of 34 days—six days faster than they were at this time last year, and 28 days faster than the U.S. overall.

It is a dramatic turn of events for a city that just a couple of years ago was still struggling to pull out of a deep housing slump, even as other markets in California surged. Sacramento is finally seeing the kind of downtown resurgence that is been happening in cities across the U.S. over the past 10 to 15 years. And the region is partly benefiting from some spillover as San Francisco and Silicon Valley’s tech boom brings skyrocketing prices and a housing shortage, pushing buyers to look further afield.

bout an hour-and-a-half drive northeast of the Bay Area, Sacramento remains relatively affordable. The median price a square foot of a Sacramento-area home is $228, compared with $531 in the Bay Area.

If current trends hold, Javier Vivas, manager of economic research for Realtor.com, predicts that Sacramento prices will rise 7.2% thisBN-TP140_SACRAM_P_20170524153605 year over last year, compared with a national average of about 3% over the same period. San Francisco prices are forecast to rise by 8.4%. (News Corp., owner of The Wall Street Journal, also operates Realtor.com under license from the National Association of Realtors.)

Nick Sadek, a real-estate agent with Sotheby’s International Realty, says about a third of his buyers come from the Bay Area. One client, who works for Google and is able to work remotely, sold his small home in Menlo Park for $4 million and bought a 3,800-square-foot home in a Sacramento suburb for $1.3 million.

Raleigh and Nan Klein sold their home in Alameda, near Oakland, last year to buy a home in Davis, 20 minutes outside of Sacramento. After 30 years, the empty nesters say they were tired of the Bay Area’s congestion and looking for an easier place to live.

“We were looking for somewhere we could walk and bike a lot,” says Mr. Klein. In December, they purchased a two-bedroom home with a den in the Cannery, a new-home community set up around an urban farm that is bikeable to town. Though the couple declined to say what they paid for their homes, similar models start in the $700,000 range.

Developers are betting big on a revitalization of the city’s downtown, which is pocked with seedy areas and long offered little beyond offices and the state capitol building.

MN-AO891_SACRAM_P_20170524153036A partly vacant West field mall has been mostly dismantled to create Downtown Commons, an 11.8-acre pedestrian-friendly residential and commercial plaza. Developed by the NBA’s Sacramento Kings and JMA Ventures, it includes offices, shopping and the new Golden 1 Center, the only indoor/outdoor NBA arena that is 100% solar-powered (and boasts an $8 million Jeff Koons sculpture). Nearby, a local developer is turning a 100-year-old bank building into a 30,000-square-foot upscale food hall. Local developer LDK Ventures is turning an old 140-acre rail yard into a development with a Kaiser hospital, a Major League Soccer stadium, offices and housing.

One of the most ambitious residential projects is the Residences at the Sawyer. Offering city and river views, as well as room service and a concierge, the condominiums are breaking new ground in pricing and amenities. Set on top of a new 250-room Skipton Hotel, condos also come with VIP access to Golden 1 Center, a private lounge and a pool and terrace overlooking the arena. One-bedrooms start at $600,000 and three-bedroom penthouses with over 3,300 square feet go up to just over $4 million, says director of sales Christopher Miller, of the Agency Development Group. The building, part of Downtown Commons, is expected to be completed in late 2017.

For more Information: Candace Jackson